The Paperman vs. the Nazis: Matthias Sindelar, the Anschluss and the fall of Red Vienna

It is imperative to understand the development of Viennese culture — its spheres of influence — and the sociology of Vienna itself, before and after the First World War, to be able to better understand the legend of Matthias Sindelar. Continue reading The Paperman vs. the Nazis: Matthias Sindelar, the Anschluss and the fall of Red Vienna

Rocking The Casbah: when Algeria brought the revolution to the football pitch

In the late 1950s, several Algerians playing in France secretly travelled to Tunisia and formed their own football team. Their objective was to garner international support for Algeria’s claim of independence from France. This is their story. Continue reading Rocking The Casbah: when Algeria brought the revolution to the football pitch

What Happens After A Women’s Match Gets Over?: society and how it affects the words we write on women’s football

What millennials have learnt about the likes of Brian Clough or Johan Cruyff simply through the power of the literature surrounding their football, they cannot hope to learn the same about a woman-coach or woman-footballer. What is written by journalists themselves about the women’s game also contribute to the existing misogyny in the sport. Continue reading What Happens After A Women’s Match Gets Over?: society and how it affects the words we write on women’s football

Eat Your Shoe: in defence of Iceland’s other football team

Reykjavik may have been the cynosure of soccer spotlight after Iceland’s tumultuous journey in UEFA Euro 2016 but the country, as it turns out, has not been completely fair to all its football champions. While the media response over the men’s team has been ecstatic, a lack of “hype” over the women’s team once again reinforces misogyny in sports, disproving the myth of an Icelandic football utopia. Continue reading Eat Your Shoe: in defence of Iceland’s other football team